Tag Archives: Iris Nebula

ZWO ASI6200 62mpx Full Frame Camera Review

I recently wrote a review on the ZWO ASI2400 24mpx full frame camera, so I thought I would also do the same for the big brother which is the ZWO ASI6200 full frame camera with a mammoth 62mpx which I picked up from 365astronomy when returning the ASI2400 after the review. Looking at both of the cameras, there is no obvious difference from the outside except for the model number, both cameras are exactly the same size and feel roughly the same weight and the build quality is identicallyu exceptional.

ASI6200MC Pro One Shot Colour Camera

If we compare the specifications of the ASI6200 to the ASI2400 we can see where each camera has an advantage over the other:

ASI2400ASI6200
Weight700g700g
SensorIMX410IMX455
Sensor SizeFull FrameFull Frame
Pixel Size5.94um3.76um
Resolution24mpx62mpx
Full Well Capacity at 0 Gain100ke51ke
Qe>80%91%
ADC14-Bit16-Bit
High Gain Mode140100
Full well at High Gain Mode20ke18ke

So as you can see from the comparison on specification there are some differences, the ASI2400 has the edge on full well capacity, however the ASI6200 has a much more smaller pixel size as well as a higher Qe which to me gives the ASI6200 the edge over the ASI2400.

Now since both cameras are the exact same field of view due to them both being full frame sensors, the question is how does this affect resolution, clearly the ASI6200 has the upper hand having significantly more pixels than the ASI2400, but how does this translate to an image?

Iris Nebula taken with the ASI2400MC Pro, 82x150S at Gain 26, darks, flats and BIAS frames applied
Iris Nebula taken with the ASI6200MC Pro 48x150S at Gain 100, Darks, Flats and BIAS frames applied

As you can see, both cameras offer the exact same field of view, however when you zoom in on the images you start to see where the ASI6200 excels above the ASI2400 with the higher resolution

On the left is the ASI2400MC Pro and on the right is the ASI6200MC Pro

As you can clearly see from the above two images, the 6200 offers a much better resolution which will allow a much finer level of detail, however, depending on your sky conditions and focal length the ASI6200 might not be possible due to over or under sampling

You can see here, that on my SharpStar 15028HNT which has a Focal Length of 420mm the ASI2400 would lead to Under Smapling in my “OK” seeing conditions

But the ASI6200 shows in the green area:

If I increase the focal length to around 1150 the ASI6200 no longer becomes suitable and the ASI2400 is more suited to this focal length and sky conditions:

So as you can see, both the ASI2400 and ASI6200 is not a “One Size Fits All” scenario, you have to work out the best suitability depending on your conditions and equipment to be used.

From a price perspective, the ASI6200 is only slightly more expensive than the ASI2400, but both cameras offer the full frame capability and a fantastic field of view, but for me personally the ASI6200 beats the ASI2400 when using the focal length of my SharpStar 15028HNT. Just like it’s smaller version, the looks, feels, sounds and operates exactly the same way. Here is another image taken with the ASI6200 and then my Synthetic SHO version which I will be writing a tutorial on how to acomplish with Dual Band Filters.

North America Nebula – 60x300S at Gain 100 using the Optolong L-eXtreme Filter on the SharpStar 15028HNT
Synthetic SHO using the same data as the previous image

Either way, both ZWO cameras I have tested have been of awesome quality, and I would recommend either camera if you wish to go down the full frame route, but personally my favourite is the ASI6200MC Pro, more images to come since this is now my new camera.

My first image with the Skywatcher Quattro 8-CF F4

NGC7023 – Iris Nebula
The Iris Nebula, also NGC 7023 and Caldwell 4, is a bright reflection nebula and Caldwell object in the constellation Cepheus. NGC 7023 is actually the cluster within the nebula, LBN 487, and the nebula is lit by a magnitude +7 star, SAO 19158.[1] It shines at magnitude +6.8. It is located near the Mira-type variable star T Cephei, and near the bright magnitude +3.23 variable star Beta Cephei (Alphirk). It lies 1,300 light-years away and is six light-years across

This is the very first time I have imaged this object, and it is the first object ot be imaged with my new Skywatcher Quattro 8-CF F4 telescope, I am extremely happy with the results

The image consists of the following:
Luminance: 19x300S
Red: 13x300S
Green: 13x300S
Blue: 13x300S

All frames have 25 darks and 25 flats applied also

Gear Used
Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Pro
Imaging Scope: Skywatcher Quattro 8-CF F4 Newtonian
Guide Scope: Celestron C80ED
Imaging Camera: Atik 383L+ Mono CCD Cooled to -20C
Filter Wheel: StarlightXpress 7x36mm USB Filterwheel
Guide Camera: QHYCCD 5L-II

Software Used
Image Acquisition: Sequence Generator Pro
Guiding: PHD2
Telescope Control: EQMOD

Image Processing:
Pre-Processing: Nebulosity 3
Stacking: Maxim-DL
Post Processing: PixInsight